Social Business

Operationalizing Social Business

xhistoric_westspan_1.jpg.pagespeed.ic.TE6ETVrAE7

Earlier this week, I sent a Brandwatch research study to my brother, who manages a radio station, about the importance of Twitter. The report indicated that radio stations do not interact with their fans enough, and instead are stuck in the old paradigm of just blasting and broadcasting their message with their traditional one way approach.

The Brandwatch study also highlighted the fact that 75% of their interactions are with celebrities and brands (who pay the advertising dollars) and not their fans. The most important (and probably obvious fact to most people) is that people follow the personalities on the radio more than the station itself.

Even with the opportunity to highlight their DJs and newscasters more, most stations do not have specific goals and strategies for leveraging social networks. While they may be on it and posting a tweet here and there, they’re not optimizing their social media presence. This number increases substantially more when you consider how many don’t know how to operationalize their social efforts.

To get started, here is a basic checklist on how to operationalize your social efforts:

  1. Set up your primary account and keep your   password information in a safe place. Also, don’t let your digital agency or PR firm set up your account. Make sure one of your employees is the lead person and manager of the account in case there are any conflicts. Note, however, that you should make sure that employee shares all info with you and signs a legal document stating they will turn over the account when then leave. There will probably be no issues about this if the employee uses your company domain account

  2. Organize Team and Identify Moderators: Use the DACI approach with clarity around who is the Driver (project manager) of the project, the Approver (who owns the budget in most cases) of the project, the Collaborators of the project (moderators) and who needs to be Informed. While it might be a cost to hire your moderators before launching, getting them on board early can help set up some of the infrastructure you need to build a successful social network presence. For example, they can create a stockpile of back up posts and also be involved in establishing the tone and spirit

  3. Document the tone and spirit of your posts and tweets: Most mature and established companies have documented their brand positioning and how they want to communicate their brand to their customers. It’s more beneficial to do this early on, rather than blindly posting and tweeting. Even smaller companies should take some time to think this through.

  4. Build out your page: Appearance is important, even on social networks. While you’re thinking about your brand positioning, the aesthetics of your page should play a role too. Leverage company branding, photography and graphics guidelines. You should have a cohesive look and feel across all your pages.

  5. Create a content calendar: Build a content calendar for each social network (and their pages) that you manage. Throwing up posts last minutes can lead to too many issues. Vice versa, planning too far ahead won’t allow you you to factor in recent newsworthy topics. Ideally, you want the calendar to cover all content for at least two weeks into the future. You can plan for a longer period of time, but I have found that it is often difficult to plan too far down the road.

  6. Create a stockpile of back up posts: There are some posts, such as standard customer service posts or event announcements or welcome posts, that you will post/tweet over and over again. You might as well have a stockpile of them ready to go.

  7. Identify tools: The cost of good social media tools is quite minimal these days. Many of them are even free. I recommend that you have at least three types of tools ready to go: a posting tool (Hootsuite or Sproutsocial, a listening tool (Radian6 or Social Mention) and an analytics tool (Twitonomy).

  8. Create Rules of Engagement, Workflow Process and Answer Decision Tree: List out desired response times, the type of posts you will respond to, and all potential issues. Then try and place them into categories and assign and and owner to each of them. You’ll be able to be quantify how successful you are by setting these rules.

  9. Outreach to relevant influencers and followers: I am big on focus, focus, focus. Don’t try and boil the whole ocean and sign up as many followers as possible. It’s about quality, not quantity. I recommend reaching out to people who would have a vested interest in your products, services or offerings.

  10. Focus on a few critical metrics: There are so many different metrics to track on a social network. Concentrate on 3-5 levers, establish a benchmark, measure your success against them and keep raising the bar. Make your goals more challenging. Hold each person on the team accountable for these goals. Social Media is a team sport.

Executing well on the above ten areas will increase a radio stations or your probability of success. Remember, it takes a while to build an audience. Remember that Rome was not built in a day and neither is a social presence. Unless you are Nike or Madonna, it might take time to build your presence and generate a high degree of engagement on a social network’s page that you manage. The keys are to be persistent and consistent.

Advertisements

New site: DigitalMarketing 2.0…(somewhat of an ad for a site I contribute to)

Digital Marketing 2.0.Com: Where Big Ideas Meet Big Data

DataXu Sponsors New Editorially-Independent Marketing Community

Andover, MA – February 22, 2012 – Human 1.0, an international business innovation firm helping clients understand, adopt and execute social business strategies, together with DataXu, provider of the industry’s only fully-integrated digital marketing management platform and number one ranked DSP current offering, are pleased to announce the launch of Digital Marketing 2.0, an editorially-independent thought leadership community for digital marketers.

Living in an era of ubiquitous digital devices is changing consumer behavior and, in turn, driving a paradigm shift in marketing. CMOs unanimously cite that they are underprepared to handle the data deluge generated by consumer interaction with digital media, and are uncertain what tools, technologies, partners and resources they will need to develop new strategies for interpreting the data and making real-time business decisions based on the insights it provides. In response, DataXu decided to launch and support an industry-wide conversation, backed by a research study, on how companies can tap into the power of the customer intelligence derived from a fully digital world.

Digital Marketing 2.0 is edited by Stacy Williams, who for 20 years has helped companies develop and implement their marketing, positioning, and internal and external communications strategies. Along with Williams, there are four main contributors including Dan Greller, an IT executive and former CIO at Legg-Mason, Ian Gertler, Chief Marketing Officer for online advertising Pioneer Cursor Marketing under Lexos Media, David Rogers, the Executive Director of BRITE at Columbia Business School and the faculty director of the school’s Executive Education program on Digital Marketing Strategy and David Allen Isben, a 25-year market-driven business strategies veteran in both the consumer and technology spaces.

“Our community discussions will focus on the promise of Big Data and the ability to create actionable insights that come with digital marketing. The community aims to deepen and drive the conversation and uncover ways in which the entire ecosystem can benefit through shared information and expertise,” said Williams.

The site is sponsored by DataXu and produced by Human 1.0.